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Experimental investigation of indoor aerosol dispersion and accumulation in the context of COVID-19: Effects of masks and ventilation: Physics of Fluids: Vol 33, No 7

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Experimental investigation of indoor aerosol dispersion and accumulation in the context of COVID-19: Effects of masks and ventilation: Physics of Fluids: Vol 33, No 7

Expiratory events, such as breathing, speaking, sneezing, or coughing, produce droplets, ranging in micrometers to millimeters in size, that serve as the primary pathway for the transmission of many infectious diseases, including coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).1–6 The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic underscored glaring gaps in our understanding of pathogen transmission required to effectively contain and prevent outbreaks, including, but not limited to, the development of reliable guidelines for safe social distancing,1,2 usage of personal protective equipment (PPE),7,8 and indoor ventilation.1,9 The initial guidelines released in early 2020 by the World Health Organization and many national health agencies assumed that COVID-19 spreads primarily through large droplets that settle on surfaces within 1 to 

2m

 from the infected individuals. Although an intense scientific debate on the main transmission pathways of COVID-19 continues,10,11 the mounting data on local outbreaks and relevant research9,12,13 have prompted significant modifications to official guidelines, which now attribute the spread of COVID-19 to a wide range of droplet sizes, including both larger respiratory droplets and microscopic aerosols, produced during various expiratory events.14–16
— Read more below on aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/5.0057100

The Washington County Auditor

Independent Investigative Journalist $tommytatumnews

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